TORONTO — A Catholic university in Ontario, Canada, says it will review any published work by its former president and vice chancellor, Basilian Father Thomas Rosica.

“Insofar as Father Rosica has admitted that his published work has included unattributed material originally published by others, it is possible that what he published as president contained similar material. We will endeavour to determine if this is the case,” Richard Corneil, president of Assumption University in Windsor, Ontario, told the Windsor Star March 8.

Father Rosica served as president and vice chancellor of the university from 2011 to 2015. In recent weeks, the priest has come under fire amid revelations of extensive plagiarism in his published articles, books and speeches.

The priest, a long-serving English language press aide at the Vatican Press Office, and the CEO of Canada’s Salt+Light Television network, was reported by Life Site News Feb. 15 to have plagiarized sections of text in several lectures and op-eds from a variety of writers, among them priests, theologians, journalists and at least two cardinals.

The priest apologized for plagiarism on Feb. 22, shortly after initial reports emerged.

“What I’ve done is wrong, and I am sorry about that. I don’t know how else to say it,” Father Rosica told the National Post.

“I realize I relied too much on compiled notes,” Father Rosica told the National Post, adding that his plagiarism was inadvertent and not malicious. He explained that “it could have been cut and paste,” apparently meaning that he had mistakenly included passages of text written by others in his texts without remembering to attribute them.

“I realize the seriousness of this, and I regret this very much. … I will be very vigilant in future,” he said.

Subsequent reports found widespread plagiarism in essays, speeches and op-eds by Father Rosica, dating back more than a decade.

In late February, evidence emerged on Twitter that Father Rosica had also copied directly and without attribution the work of several theologians in a 1994 article he published in the theological journal Worship.

Liturgical Press, which publishes the journal, announced Feb. 26 “that the editors of Worship are retracting the [1994] article by Thomas M. Rosica because of plagiarism.”

Liturgical Press subsequently retracted two additional articles published by the priest.

The 1994 article covers the same topic as Father Rosica’s 1990 licentiate thesis at the Pontifical Biblical Institute, leading some to raise questions about whether that text, through which the priest earned a pontifical degree in Scripture, might also have been plagiarized.

Last week, the priest was discovered to have misrepresented his studies at the Ecole Biblique et Archéologique Française de Jérusalem. While he had claimed to have a decree from graduate school, its director told journalists that while Father Rosica had been enrolled there, he had not earned a degree of any kind.

On Feb. 24, Father Rosica resigned from the Collegium, or governing board, of the University of St. Michael’s College in Toronto and the governing boards of St. John Fisher College in New York and the University of St. Thomas in Houston.

On Feb. 25, Father Rosica acknowledged to The Catholic Register that he had plagiarized. “We know that plagiarism is wrong, especially when it is practiced deliberately. Please note that my actions were never deliberate. Nevertheless, they were wrong.”

While the board of directors at the Salt and Light Media Foundation has acknowledged that Father Rosica’s plagiarism was wrong, the board chairman, Tony Gagliano, said in a March 7 statement that board members “unanimously pledge our support of the continued leadership of Father Rosica as chief executive officer.”

“For the past 16 years, Father Thomas Rosica has worked consistently with young adults on many media platforms and in multiple languages to offer experiences of unity, prayer, celebration, reflection, education, dialogue, thought-provoking reporting and stories of faith and action. This work must continue,” the board statement said.

The Knights of Columbus, financial supporters of Salt+Light, have told reporters that they will review and re-evaluate their relationship with the media network.